Berean Bible Study Notes

John 2:1-12

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The Wedding at Cana

John 2:1 (NKJV) On the third day there was a wedding in Cana of Galilee, and the mother of Jesus was there. 2 Now both Jesus and His disciples were invited to the wedding. 3 And when they ran out of wine, the mother of Jesus said to Him, "They have no wine."

4 Jesus said to her, "Woman, what does your concern have to do with Me? My hour has not yet come."

5 His mother said to the servants, "Whatever He says to you, do it."

6 Now there were set there six waterpots of stone, according to the manner of purification of the Jews, containing twenty or thirty gallons apiece. 7 Jesus said to them, "Fill the waterpots with water." And they filled them up to the brim. 8 And He said to them, "Draw some out now, and take it to the master of the feast." And they took it. 9 When the master of the feast had tasted the water that was made wine, and did not know where it came from (but the servants who had drawn the water knew), the master of the feast called the bridegroom. 10 And he said to him, "Every man at the beginning sets out the good wine, and when the guests have well drunk, then the inferior. You have kept the good wine until now!"

11 This beginning of signs Jesus did in Cana of Galilee, and manifested His glory; and His disciples believed in Him.

12 After this He went down to Capernaum, He, His mother, His brothers, and His disciples; and they did not stay there many days.

 

John 2:1 (and) On the third day there was a wedding in Cana of Galilee, and the mother of Jesus was there.

This verse actually starts with the word "and" in the Greek, which links it back to what happened previously. The Greek word "kai" has a specific use. It's usually translated "and" and is used to link related things together, but still keep them separate - like cars on a train. So, the beginning of Chapter 2 refers us back to the previous verses.

On the third day there was a wedding. On the third day from what? Some commentators refer back to John the Baptist's discussion of Jesus' baptism and say that it was the third day from Jesus' baptism. However, that doesn't fit with the other Gospels. The other Gospels say that after Jesus' baptism, He went into the wilderness and fasted for 40 days. So, the third day from what? It would seem to be the third day from the calling of the disciples. If you go back to John 1, the first specific day mentioned is the day that the priests and Levites come to see John the Baptist:

Day 1 - When the priests and Levites come to ask John the Baptist who he is:

John 1:19 Now this is the testimony of John, when the Jews sent priests and Levites from Jerusalem to ask him, "Who are you?"

John 1:24 Now those who were sent were from the Pharisees. 25 And they asked him, saying, "Why then do you baptize if you are not the Christ, nor Elijah, nor the Prophet?"

26 John answered them, saying,"I baptize with water, but there stands One among you whom you do not know. 27 It is He who, coming after me, is preferred before me, whose sandal strap I am not worthy to loose."

28 These things were done in Bethabara beyond the Jordan, where John was baptizing.

 

Day 2 - John the Baptist points out Jesus and refers to Jesus' baptism, which had taken place at some point in the past:

John 1:29 The next day John saw Jesus coming toward him, and said, "Behold! The Lamb of God who takes away the sin of the world!

32 And John bore witness, saying, "I saw the Spirit descending from heaven like a dove, and He remained upon Him. 33 I did not know Him, but He who sent me to baptize with water said to me, 'Upon whom you see the Spirit descending, and remaining on Him, this is He who baptizes with the Holy Spirit.' 34 And I have seen and testified that this is the Son of God."

 

Day 3 - John the Baptist again points out Jesus, and this time, two of John's disciples, Andrew and John, follow Him to where He is staying. They started out at Bethabara and go with Jesus to some unnamed place. Andrew is from Bethsaida, and goes to find his brother Peter, also from Bethsaida. Bethsaida is on the northern shore of the Sea of Galilee. Peter must be somewhere relatively nearby, not at Bethsaida. This is Day 1 of the calling of the disciples.

John 1:35 Again, the next day, John stood with two of his disciples. 36 And looking at Jesus as He walked, he said,"Behold the Lamb of God!"

37 The two disciples heard him speak, and they followed Jesus. 38 Then Jesus turned, and seeing them following, said to them, "What do you seek?"

They said to Him, "Rabbi" (which is to say, when translated, Teacher), "where are You staying?"

39 He said to them, "Come and see." They came and saw where He was staying, and remained with Him that day (now it was about the tenth hour).

40 One of the two who heard John speak, and followed Him, was Andrew, Simon Peter's brother. 41 He first found his own brother Simon, and said to him, "We have found the Messiah" (which is translated, the Christ). 42 And he brought him to Jesus.

 

Day 4 - Jesus wants to go to Galilee. He finds Philip, who is also from Bethsaida. Philip finds Nathanael, who is from Cana, which was probably at Kfar Kanna, about 8 miles north or northeast of Nazareth. We don't know if either of these men were found in their hometowns or somewhere away from home. Jesus may have found Philip in Galilee or on the way to Galilee. This is Day 2 of the calling of the disciples.

John 1:43 The following day Jesus wanted to go to Galilee, and He found Philip and said to him, "Follow Me." 44 Now Philip was from Bethsaida, the city of Andrew and Peter. 45 Philip found Nathanael and said to him, "We have found Him of whom Moses in the law, and also the prophets, wrote — Jesus of Nazareth, the son of Joseph."

 

Eastons Bible Dictionary: Youngblood, R. F., Bruce, F. F., Harrison, R. K., & Thomas Nelson Publishers. 1995. Nelson's new illustrated Bible dictionary. Rev. ed. of: Nelson's illustrated Bible dictionary.; Includes index. T. Nelson: Nashville

Regardless of where exactly everyone is earlier, "on the third day," Jesus is at Cana, over 60 miles from Bethabara. When He said "follow me," He apparently meant more than just spiritually!

John 2:1 (and) On the third day there was a wedding in Cana of Galilee, and the mother of Jesus was there.

 So, does this mean on the third day from the calling of the disciples? Perhaps. John does present it that way. There are two days of calling disciples and a wedding on the third day. Another possibility is that it means the third day of the week, which was Tuesday. Many weddings took place on Tuesday, because it was the day of double blessing:

Genesis 1:6 Then God said,"Let there be a firmament in the midst of the waters, and let it divide the waters from the waters." 7 Thus God made the firmament, and divided the waters which were under the firmament from the waters which were above the firmament; and it was so. 8 And God called the firmament Heaven. So the evening and the morning were the second day.

9 Then God said,"Let the waters under the heavens be gathered together into one place, and let the dry land appear"; and it was so. 10 And God called the dry land Earth, and the gathering together of the waters He called Seas. And God saw that it was good.

11 Then God said, "Let the earth bring forth grass, the herb that yields seed, and the fruit tree that yields fruit according to its kind, whose seed is in itself, on the earth"; and it was so. 12 And the earth brought forth grass, the herb that yields seed according to its kind, and the tree that yields fruit, whose seed is in itself according to its kind. And God saw that it was good. 13 So the evening and the morning were the third day.

If you read Genesis 1 carefully, you'll see that there was no blessing on the second day, Monday, but there were two blessings on the third day, Tuesday.

Personally, I believe that it means both - the third day of the week and the third day from the calling of the disciples. Jesus spends two days calling disciples and there was a wedding on the third day. If you remember from last year, that phrase "the third day" nearly always hints at resurrection. What will happen on our resurrection day? A wedding! Jesus has spent nearly 2,000 years "calling disciples." Is that reading too much in to it? Probably. Guess we'll just have to wait and see.

John 2:1 (NKJV) On the third day there was a wedding in Cana of Galilee, and the mother of Jesus was there. 2 Now both Jesus and His disciples were invited to the wedding.


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Cana - (map from above and fairly good blurb)

It's interesting that no where in this Gospel does John ever call Mary by name. She's always the "mother of Jesus." Remember that Jesus put Mary into John's care from the cross. He was to care for her as his mother, so to call her "Mary" would have been disrespectful. Yet, she wasn't his actual mother, so he calls her "the mother of Jesus."

Jesus and his brand new disciples were invited, which implies that the person doing the inviting knows both Jesus and the disciples. Jesus only seems to have had disciples for two days, so the fact that they were together seems to be common knowledge, at least to the wedding hosts. Mary is also somehow in a position to be giving the servants orders, so this was apparently a family well known to Mary and Jesus.

The Ancient Jewish Wedding

The wedding symbolism is used often in the New Testament, so it pays to know how they work. In that culture, it was common for weddings to be arranged by the fathers. The groom may ask his father to seek a particular bride, as Samson did, or the groom may trust his father to find him the right wife, as Abraham did for Isaac, through his servant Eliezer. (That whole story in Genesis 24 is an interesting picture, and I encourage you to read it. Abraham is a type of the Father. Eliezer, a type of the Holy Spirit, who is unnamed in that account and whose name means "Comforter," is sent to find a wife for Isaac, a type of the Son. Rebekah, who becomes a type of the church, agrees to marry Isaac without having seen him and receives gifts from Eliezer. Isaac was last seen at his "almost" sacrifice and disappears from the account and doesn't appear again until he meets Rebekah on the way to his father's house).

The bride price is established, and once the fathers agree, the woman is often asked whether she is willing. The potential groom, along with his father, would visit the potential bride's home. He would pour her a glass of wine, and if she agreed to the marriage, she would drink it. This began the formal engagement or betrothal period, which was legally binding (according to Jewish writings, there may also have been papers drawn up). It could only be broken by an official divorce. The engagement period usually lasted at least a year, long enough for the bride's purity to be evident to all. During that time, the bride and groom were never together alone. During this period, the groom was adding a room onto his father's house, or building a house nearby, or at the very least, fixing up an existing room in his father's home. Remember, the phrase, In my Father's house are many rooms...I am going there to prepare a place for you? This is something right out of ancient Jewish weddings.

The bride's job during the engagement was to learn how to please her future husband. Now, here's the interesting part. She didn't know exactly when this wedding was going to take place! The groom didn't even know. It was up to the groom's father to decide whether the bride's chamber was ready or not. Since most engagements were about a year long, she'd know the general time frame, and you can bet she was very interested in anything anyone could tell her about the progress of the preparations! I'm willing to bet she had some hints as to whether the day was approaching or not.

So, as the day approached, her attendants were supposed to be ready also. Finally, the day would come when the groom's father would say, "It's time. Go get your bride." Now, for whatever reason (maybe for fun?), the bridegroom usually came at midnight with a whole procession. This group was joyful and cheering, sometimes even playing musical instruments, as they approached the bride's home, so the whole village knew that the day had come. When they were a little distance away, they would give a great shout, "The bridegroom comes!" and the bride and her attendants would come out and join the groom.

From what I understand, many times, the wedding actually took place right then, in the street, under the stars. Then, the whole procession went back to the groom's home, where the bridal chamber awaited. The bride and groom went into seclusion in the cheder, the bridal chamber, containing the chuppah or huppah, the bridal canopy, usually for seven days, (remember Jacob and the "bridal week?") while the rest of the group ate and drank. (At some point, the chuppah or wedding canopy became part of the wedding ceremony itself). Although the groom might come and go from the cheder, the bride was tucked away the whole time. Someday, for fun, you should look up "cheder" in the Bible and see where it appears. You might be very surprised!

Finally, when the seven days were up (or however long, but seven days was apparently typical), the bride and groom appeared in public and the marriage feast would take place. It seems the eating and drinking during the seven days was not actually the marriage feast, as the bride and groom were not present together yet.

So, Jesus and his disciples were at the wedding celebration, probably during the time when the bride was in seclusion. His being there put His stamp of approval on the entire concept of marriage. Note that we don't even have to wonder whether this marriage was between a man and a woman. God made them male and female, and a man will leave his father and mother and be united to his wife, and they will become one flesh. Any other kind of "marriage" is just a perversion of what God intended.

Here is an interesting article that shows more about the deep symbolism of the Jewish wedding. This one stays away from taking the speculation too far:

The Ultimate Wedding

There are many, many more articles that you can read, but choose with discernment:

Ancient Jewish Wedding - Google search

 

Back to our verses:

John 2:1 (NKJV) On the third day there was a wedding in Cana of Galilee, and the mother of Jesus was there. 2 Now both Jesus and His disciples were invited to the wedding. 3 And when they ran out of wine, the mother of Jesus said to Him, "They have no wine."

4 Jesus said to her, "Woman, what does your concern have to do with Me? My hour has not yet come."

5 His mother said to the servants, "Whatever He says to you, do it."

Or, as the NIV puts it:

John 2:1 (NIV) On the third day a wedding took place at Cana in Galilee. Jesus' mother was there, 2 and Jesus and his disciples had also been invited to the wedding. 3 When the wine was gone, Jesus' mother said to him, "They have no more wine."

4 "Dear woman, why do you involve me?" Jesus replied. "My time has not yet come."

5 His mother said to the servants, "Do whatever he tells you."

The party had run out of wine. Mary, who is serving in some kind of position of hostess, comes to Jesus, expecting Him to do something about it. Remember, that to this point, Jesus has done no miracles. But, now, He's left home, and gathered several disciples. Perhaps she's thinking that He is going to start showing who He really is, and that will take away her apparent disgrace.

Jon Courson says, (Courson, J. 2003. Jon Courson's Application Commentary . Thomas Nelson: Nashville, TN):

Jesus responds:

John 2:4 (NKJV) Jesus said to her, "Woman, what does your concern have to do with Me? My hour has not yet come."

5 His mother said to the servants, "Whatever He says to you, do it."

It sounds a bit harsh in the King James and in the New King James. Vine's Expository Dictionary says this about the word "gune", translated here as just "woman:"

So, in this case, the NIV actually translates it better. It's not a rebuke, as some commentaries say. Yet, Jesus is not responding as Mary's son, either. He has begun His public ministry, and what He does or doesn't do will be according to His Father's wishes and timetable:

John 2:4 (NIV)"Dear woman, why do you involve me?" Jesus replied. "My time has not yet come."

5 His mother said to the servants, "Do whatever he tells you."

The People's Bible, John (Baumler, G., The People's Bible: John, 1997, Northwestern Publishing House, Milwaukee) says:

Jesus goes on to say, "My hour has not yet come." John will tell us two more times that the hour had not yet come:

John 7:30 Therefore they sought to take Him; but no one laid a hand on Him, because His hour had not yet come.

John 8:20 These words Jesus spoke in the treasury, as He taught in the temple; and no one laid hands on Him, for His hour had not yet come.

So what was "the hour" that John refers to seven times all together? Jesus tells us later:

John 17:1 Jesus spoke these words, lifted up His eyes to heaven, and said: "Father, the hour has come. Glorify Your Son, that Your Son also may glorify You, 2 as You have given Him authority over all flesh, that He should give eternal life to as many as You have given Him. 3 And this is eternal life, that they may know You, the only true God, and Jesus Christ whom You have sent. 4 I have glorified You on the earth. I have finished the work which You have given Me to do. 5 And now, O Father, glorify Me together with Yourself, with the glory which I had with You before the world was.

The hour was the time of Jesus’ crucifixion, resurrection, and ascension, the time when He could declare from the cross, "It is finished," the time when Jesus would complete all that the prophets had written of His first coming.

So, what is Jesus saying to Mary? I believe He is saying that she will have to wait a bit longer for everything she hopes for to come. He understands her pain and the seeming disgrace she has endured for thirty years. But, it's not yet time for "every knee to bow." First, He must complete what He came for - to give his life as a ransom for many.

Mary apparently accepts that, but still trusts that Jesus will do what is needed for the situation at hand, because she says to the servants, Do whatever he tells you.

John 2:6 (NKJV) Now there were set there six waterpots of stone, according to the manner of purification of the Jews, containing twenty or thirty gallons apiece. 7 Jesus said to them, "Fill the waterpots with water." And they filled them up to the brim. 

Jesus, Mary, the disciples and the servants seem to be somewhere away from the general crowd. No one but the disciples and the servants have heard what has transpired between Mary and Jesus. Wherever they are, it is where there are six large stone waterpots. I'm picturing them hanging out in the kitchen, while most of the guests are off in the family room with the big screen TV. (Just kidding)

There were six of these stone pots - not seven, not five - and they were empty. They were for "purification." Mark gives us a hint:

Mark 7:3(The Pharisees and all the Jews do not eat unless they give their hands a ceremonial washing, holding to the tradition of the elders. 4 When they come from the marketplace they do not eat unless they wash. And they observe many other traditions, such as the washing of cups, pitchers and kettles.

So, these were probably the pots used for ceremonial cleansing of people and things. Note how Mark calls them "traditions." This wasn't anything that God had specified, but were rules made up by men. This goes way beyond clean dishes. The Jews had developed rules for everything, in order to try to stay right with God. They thought they just had to keep all the rules, and God would be pleased. God had certainly specified laws for them, but men had piled rule upon rule on the people in addition to the law of Moses. And, what did God think about their empty rituals?

Matthew 15:9 They worship me in vain; their teachings are but rules taught by men.

Six - the number of man - stone water pots, standing empty and waiting. Now, this is just a possibility, but could God have been drawing a picture here? Men, with stony hearts, standing empty before God, bearing nothing worthwhile? Men with barren rituals, trying to get right with God?

OK, please don't make too much of this, because there's no way to know for sure, but let's explore this idea a little more. Does wine symbolize something in Scripture?

Psalm 104:14 He makes grass grow for the cattle, and plants for man to cultivate — bringing forth food from the earth: 15 wine that gladdens the heart of man, oil to make his face shine, and bread that sustains his heart.

Judges 9:13 "But the vine answered, 'Should I give up my wine, which cheers both gods and men, to hold sway over the trees?'

Eccl. 9:7 Go, eat your food with gladness, and drink your wine with a joyful heart, for it is now that God favors what you do.

Psalm 4:7 You have filled my heart with greater joy than when their grain and new wine abound.

It doesn't seem too much of a stretch to suggest that wine may symbolize joy in the Old Testament. The Rabbis seem to agree:

Wine symbolizes joy in Judaism: (This is from a Jewish site - not Messianic Christian. Interesting symbolism!)

In the New Testament, what do you think of when you think of wine? Communion, right? And Jesus saying, "Drink from it, all of you. For this is My blood of the new covenant, which is shed for many for the remission of sins." Blood shed for sins - the salvation wrought for us by our Savior. So, in the New Testament, wine reminds us of Jesus' blood and salvation. So, are we talking two different things here? I don't think so. I think joy and salvation are all wrapped up together, too:

Psalm 51:11 Do not cast me from your presence or take your Holy Spirit from me. 12 Restore to me the joy of your salvation and grant me a willing spirit, to sustain me.

Psalm 95:1 Come, let us sing for joy to the LORD; let us shout aloud to the Rock of our salvation. 2 Let us come before him with thanksgiving and extol him with music and song.

So, perhaps, the symbolism of wine is tied in with joy and salvation and Jesus, too:

John 15:1 "I am the true vine, (the symbolism is a grape vine) and my Father is the gardener. 2 He cuts off every branch in me that bears no fruit, while every branch that does bear fruit he prunes so that it will be even more fruitful. 3 You are already clean because of the word I have spoken to you. 4 Remain in me, and I will remain in you. No branch can bear fruit by itself; it must remain in the vine. Neither can you bear fruit unless you remain in me.

5 "I am the vine; you are the branches. If a man remains in me and I in him, he will bear much fruit; apart from me you can do nothing. 6 If anyone does not remain in me, he is like a branch that is thrown away and withers; such branches are picked up, thrown into the fire and burned. 7 If you remain in me and my words remain in you, ask whatever you wish, and it will be given you. 8 This is to my Father's glory, that you bear much fruit, showing yourselves to be my disciples.

9 "As the Father has loved me, so have I loved you. Now remain in my love. 10 If you obey my commands, you will remain in my love, just as I have obeyed my Father's commands and remain in his love. 11 I have told you this so that my joy may be in you and that your joy may be complete.

 

On Jesus' last night with the disciples before His crucifixion, He said:

Mark 14:24 "This is my blood of the covenant, which is poured out for many," he said to them. 25 "I tell you the truth, I will not drink again of the fruit of the vine until that day when I drink it anew in the kingdom of God."

Or, as Luke puts it:

Luke 22:18 "For I tell you I will not drink again of the fruit of the vine until the kingdom of God comes."

Jesus is waiting until HIS wedding day to drink wine again. On that day, both our salvation and our joy will be complete. So, what does all this have to do with empty waterpots?

Well, consider this possibility. (Please don't get too hung up on this. It's just a possibility, based on what seem to be consistent symbols in the Bible) What had happened to the wine?

John 2:3 When the wine was gone, Jesus' mother said to him, "They have no more wine."

And:

John 2:6 Nearby stood six stone water jars, the kind used by the Jews for ceremonial washing, each holding from twenty to thirty gallons.

What had the religion of the Jews become? Barren, joyless and lead by men with stony hearts, who piled rules upon rules on the people with their empty rituals and traditions. So, the people, who wanted to be right with God, had become dry, empty vessels. The wine had run out. Try looking up "empty" in the Bible.

So, what happens? Enter the Savior:

John 2:7 Jesus said to them, "Fill the waterpots with water." And they filled them up to the brim.

The servants don't question, don't hesitate and don't skimp. They do what He asks, and do it with gusto.

OK, to continue a little more with our picture, does filling the empty purification pots with water symbolize anything? Perhaps. . .

John 7:37 On the last and greatest day of the Feast, Jesus stood and said in a loud voice, "If anyone is thirsty, let him come to me and drink. 38 Whoever believes in me, as the Scripture has said, streams of living water will flow from within him." 39 By this he meant the Spirit, whom those who believed in him were later to receive. Up to that time the Spirit had not been given, since Jesus had not yet been glorified.

John 4:13 Jesus answered, "Everyone who drinks this water will be thirsty again, 14 but whoever drinks the water I give him will never thirst. Indeed, the water I give him will become in him a spring of water welling up to eternal life."

Revelation 22:17 The Spirit and the bride say, "Come!" And let him who hears say, "Come!" Whoever is thirsty, let him come; and whoever wishes, let him take the free gift of the water of life.

I think filling the waterpots (by unnamed servants) may symbolize being filled with the Holy Spirit.

Ezekiel 36:25 I will sprinkle clean water on you, and you will be clean; I will cleanse you from all your impurities and from all your idols. 26 I will give you a new heart and put a new spirit in you; I will remove from you your heart of stone and give you a heart of flesh. 27 And I will put my Spirit in you and move you to follow my decrees and be careful to keep my laws.

 

John 2:8 Then he told them, "Now draw some out and take it to the master of the banquet."

They did so, 9 and the master of the banquet tasted the water that had been turned into wine. He did not realize where it had come from, though the servants who had drawn the water knew. Then he called the bridegroom aside 10 and said, "Everyone brings out the choice wine first and then the cheaper wine after the guests have had too much to drink; but you have saved the best till now."

Jesus turned the water into wine, and not just good wine, but the best wine. What does being filled with the Holy Spirit lead to? Good fruit:

Ephesians 5:22 But the fruit of the Spirit is love, joy, peace, patience, kindness, goodness, faithfulness, 23 gentleness and self-control. Against such things there is no law.

 

Jesus didn't provide just a little wine, but a great plenty:

John 15:5 "I am the vine; you are the branches. If a man remains in me and I in him, he will bear much fruit; apart from me you can do nothing.

Some people say that in this passage, Jesus is endorsing "partying hard." You need to read carefully, though. This is not saying that at THIS wedding people had too much to drink. Nor is it saying that Jesus provided so much that it led to drunkenness. Remember that wedding gatherings were often a week long, with many people coming and going.

John 2:11 This, the first of his miraculous signs, Jesus performed at Cana in Galilee. He thus revealed his glory, and his disciples put their faith in him.

If this little picture I've drawn you is correct, then this first miracle was amazingly appropriate. In it was a complete picture of the work Jesus had come to do - to bring forth streams of living water and to fill our empty lives with abundant joy. He filled us with the joy of His salvation. As He said, I am come that they might have life, and that they might have it more abundantly. (John 10:10)

This was not a public miracle. Only the servants and the disciples knew what had happened. But, He revealed His glory to them, and they put their faith in Him.

NOTE: This verse does away with all those silly stories of Jesus' miracles as a child.

John 2:12 After this he went down to Capernaum with his mother and brothers and his disciples. There they stayed for a few days.

After this, Mary is with Him and also His brothers. That's interesting, since they did not believe in Him until His resurrection, and perhaps not all of them even then. The only two we know for sure did are James and Jude. Don't you wonder what the conversation was like, as the disciples discussed the miracle? Joseph is no longer on the scene, and has apparently died.

From Nelson's Bible Dictionary (Youngblood, R. F., Bruce, F. F., Harrison, R. K., & Thomas Nelson Publishers. 1995. Nelson's new illustrated Bible dictionary. Nashville):

I don't know for sure that the picture I laid out for you is correct. I do know that Jesus has redeemed us from an empty way of life:

1 Peter 1:17 Since you call on a Father who judges each man's work impartially, live your lives as strangers here in reverent fear. 18 For you know that it was not with perishable things such as silver or gold that you were redeemed from the empty way of life handed down to you from your forefathers, 19 but with the precious blood of Christ, a lamb without blemish or defect.

And, I do know that our salvation should lead to joy:

Isaiah 12:2 Surely God is my salvation; I will trust and not be afraid. The LORD, the LORD, is my strength and my song; he has become my salvation." 3 With joy you will draw water from the wells of salvation.

The wedding picture is one of the most amazing in Scripture - that we, the church, are the Bride of Christ:

Ephesians 5:25 Husbands, love your wives, just as Christ loved the church and gave himself up for her 26 to make her holy, cleansing her by the washing with water through the word, 27 and to present her to himself as a radiant church, without stain or wrinkle or any other blemish, but holy and blameless. 28 In this same way, husbands ought to love their wives as their own bodies. He who loves his wife loves himself. 29 After all, no one ever hated his own body, but he feeds and cares for it, just as Christ does the church— 30 for we are members of his body. 31 "For this reason a man will leave his father and mother and be united to his wife, and the two will become one flesh." 32 This is a profound mystery — but I am talking about Christ and the church.

 

I'd like to leave you with this thought. I think Isaiah 55 goes with our Scripture very well. The New King James calls this the Invitation to Abundant Life:

Isaiah 55:1 "Ho! Everyone who thirsts, Come to the waters; And you who have no money, Come, buy and eat. Yes, come, buy wine and milk Without money and without price.

2 Why do you spend money for what is not bread, And your wages for what does not satisfy? Listen carefully to Me, and eat what is good, And let your soul delight itself in abundance.

3 Incline your ear, and come to Me. Hear, and your soul shall live; And I will make an everlasting covenant with you, the sure mercies of David. 4 Indeed I have given him as a witness to the people, A leader and commander for the people.

5 Surely you shall call a nation you do not know, And nations who do not know you shall run to you, Because of the LORD your God, And the Holy One of Israel; For He has glorified you."

6 Seek the LORD while He may be found, Call upon Him while He is near.

7 Let the wicked forsake his way, And the unrighteous man his thoughts; Let him return to the LORD, And He will have mercy on him; And to our God, For He will abundantly pardon.

8 "For My thoughts are not your thoughts, Nor are your ways My ways," says the LORD. 9 "For as the heavens are higher than the earth, So are My ways higher than your ways, And My thoughts than your thoughts.

10 "For as the rain comes down, and the snow from heaven, And do not return there, But water the earth, And make it bring forth and bud, That it may give seed to the sower And bread to the eater, 11 So shall My word be that goes forth from My mouth; It shall not return to Me void, But it shall accomplish what I please, And it shall prosper in the thing for which I sent it.

12 "For you shall go out with joy, And be led out with peace; The mountains and the hills Shall break forth into singing before you, And all the trees of the field shall clap their hands. 13 Instead of the thorn shall come up the cypress tree, And instead of the brier shall come up the myrtle tree; And it shall be to the LORD for a name, For an everlasting sign that shall not be cut off."

 

I don't know about you, but I'm looking forward to that future wedding to come!

Revelation 22:17 The Spirit and the bride say, "Come!" And let him who hears say, "Come!" Whoever is thirsty, let him come; and whoever wishes, let him take the free gift of the water of life.







The Berean Bible Study of the Gospel of John




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Now the Bereans were of more noble character than the Thessalonians, for they received the message with great eagerness and examined the Scriptures every day to see if what Paul said was true. - Acts 17:11

© 2012 This study was written by Jacqui Komschlies and last updated 2/1/2012. If you have questions, comments, corrections or concerns, please write me.

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